Making Your Own Survival Knife – Part 1

I have always been fascinated with creating things, whether its writing, graphic design, YouTube or Photography, i love creating things myself. There is a certain feeling of accomplishment when you can make something beautiful out of nothing. I have always loved knives, so I decided it was time for me to learn how to make one myself. I started with a 5/8 inch thick steel sheet, and cut it into what I thought would be a good block for my knife template.

From there, I grabbed my grinder and just started grinding away steel until I had a shape that roughly resembled what I wanted the knife to look like.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After a lot of filing to get the excess metal shavings off of the corners, I proceeded to grind in the bevels. Of course I don’t have access to a big belt sander like most knife makers do, so I got my hands on the next best thing. A hand held belt sander. The problem with this is its hard to make any kind of rig to control the angle of the bevel. So I had to eyeball the angle, fortunately it came out close, but there were differing angles as you went up the blade, it really didn’t look too bad but it wouldn’t have passed quality control.

None of those imperfections really mattered however, because the next step was heat treating the knife to harden the steel. A plethora of YouTube videos made it look much easier than it was. First I tried using a large propane torch and shooting the flame into a brick where the knife sat, this did not even get the metal close to hot enough. So I decided to go a more traditional route and cover the metal in charcoal. I spent about 20 minutes heating up a mound of charcoal until the metal was red hot. ( I didn’t test it with a magnet, my first mistake).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I pulled it out of the coals with my tong and proceeded to dip it into peanut oil. Unfortunately it seemed that the charcoal had stuck to the metal, and through the quenching had fused into the metal. This not only bent and ate into my steel, warping my knife, but it fused a mount of charcoal remains onto the metal, which was NOT easy to file off. Needless to say, the end product looked like this. Back to the drawing table…..

Realizing What Is Important In Life…

Last weekend I spent some time at Ludington State Park to relax and spend some time away from the rest of the world. Truth is, I have been struggling with some relationship issues for the last month and I needed to get out of town to spend some time with some good friends and reflect on my life.

If you are like me, you struggle with letting go of things whether its stress, relationships or just problems in general. The only way I can really let go of things is to just spend time away from my phone and computer, sever contact with the outside world and just spend time with good friends and once again realizing why I should appreciate my life. I let the problems of my life halt me in fear so much, it stops me from being happy. I haven’t been really, truly happy for the last 10 months, and hopefully this was the start of my healing process.

Sitting there, by the fire having good conversation while surrounded by people who love me and care about me really helped me realize what I should be focusing on in this life. Not fear, not the stresses of my job, not damaging relationships, but family and my own personal emotional health.

If you haven’t been truly happy with your life for a while, I encourage you to focus on whats truly important in your life and let go of those things that constantly drain you emotionally. It is a hard process, I am still going through it, but it will be worth it in the end.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

DIY Fire-starter For Your Next Adventure!

One of the most important parts of camping is having a warm fire to cook food on and warm up by, and if you are like me, sometimes you have a hard time actually starting the fire. While there are plenty of products you can buy that will help make your next fire much easier to get going, there are also a myriad of great DIY methods. One of the best ways, is Char Cloth, which is cheap and very easy to make!

Having a flint and stone out in the woods can be a huge start to getting a fire started, but from my past experiences, sparks can be a  fickle way of starting a fire, so its important to have something that will light on fire at the smallest spark. Thats where Char Cloth comes in. The Art of Manliness says that “Char cloth is created through a process of pyrolysis, which Wikipedia tells us is the ‘thermochemical decomposition of organic material at elevated temperature in the absence of oxygen.’ Basically, char cloth is created by combusting an organic material in a way that releases its gasses without burning it up completely”. This makes a material that will combust at the slightest spark, making it the ideal method of starting a fire in a survival situation.

What you need: 

  • Altoids mint tin (or any enclosed tin)
  • Small pieces of cloth
  • An open flame

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

The first step is to place the cut up pieces of cloth into the tin can as flat as you can ( I placed them in all clumped up and they didn’t char as evenly as they should). Next poke a small hole into the top of the can for the gasses to be released and place into an open flame.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As you can see, I messed up my first batch and had to switch tins, so don’t be scared to mess up, you can always retry. The process of pyrolysis can take anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes, but generally you just want to wait until you cant see any gas coming out of the vent anymore. Once the gas is not coming out, that means the cloth is ready.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Open up the can once it is cooled down and your cloth should be completely black and feel more brittle than it did before. Test it out by using a flint and steel to spark it, it should light up very easily.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Once you have perfected your process, repeat as necessary. Make sure you bring with you on any camping trips for the next time you might have to make a fire and have no other methods available to you.

Know of a better way to make it? Comment below!

 

Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/garrettnear/

Like This Post!

Follow The Blog!

 

Sources:

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2015/02/10/the-ultimate-firestarter-how-to-make-char-cloth/

 

5 Reasons Why You Should Have A Knife On Every Trip…

One of the most important tools you can have while camping is a knife, and not only for survival (Although we will get into that later in this post) but also for general tasks. The blog Eating Utensils states “From the early days of our race, the knife represented one of the first and most important tools that enabled rise of our technology, military, culture, science and all other things that brought us to this point of modern civilization. As a vital tool for survival, combat, construction and food preparation, the knife quickly became the most basic tool from which all other were born.” We can see that obviously the knife is one of the most important tools invented by man, and rightly so.

I myself have started carrying a small folder around everywhere with me for the last month and found that I use it a lot more than I would have thought. So without further adieu, lets get into the 5 reasons you should always bring a knife when hiking.

 

 

Food

The knife is pretty basic right? Just a piece of metal with a sharp edge, but it serves many important purposes. One of the most important purposes a knife can serve is obviously cutting through packaging. When you are eating dry freezed food that is served in tough plastic packaging while on the trail, you need something to open it with, otherwise it will be a messy experience. And this goes not only for packaging but also for food. Sometimes when I go on shorter overnight camping trips I like to bring more unconventional food with me since I am not worried about weight, as you can see below. A knife really helped me cut up my vegetables (And even open my can of beans!) to get them cooked up for supper.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Recreation

But of course knives are not only good for food and food preparation. A good knife can also be used for tasks like carving out a walking stick as I did when on top of the Appalachians, I realized I needed a support stick to get down the mountain. Not only can they be used for simple carving tasks like that, but they can also provide you with a tool for whittling, something to pass the time as you relax in the wilderness.

-Selecting-The-Best-Camping-Knife

(This photo is from https://theadventureland.com/best-camping-knives/, which is a great post I would recommend reading.)

There is nothing so relaxing as sitting around the fire with friends and carving a piece of wood into a remotely noticeable shape.

 

First Aid

When you are in the woods anything can happen, and sometimes it can take hours for emergency medical personnel to reach you. While obviously you should always have a first aid kit on you with band aids, antiseptic and gauze pads, a knife is always an important tool to keep on you in case of a medical emergency. If you get a large sliver or need to cut Gauze or a tourniquet to bandage your wound, a knife is a great tool to have with you. It also helps that you feel a bit like Rambo when using a good sized knife to get out a little sliver.

RamboPromo

(I can’t promise you will look this good, but get a knife that big and you just might.)

 

Self-Defense & Hunting

This may be the most obvious point, but it goes without saying that when it comes to self defense, a good knife may be the most effective and efficient tool in your arsenal. Now of course, some of you may say that a gun is more effective at stopping a charging animal that is wanting to attack you, but do you really want to lug a heavy pistol and ammo up a mountain with you for this sole purpose? No. When it comes to self defense in the wilderness, your best choice will be a good bear spray along with a sharp knife. It goes without saying that you will not want to rely on the knife solely for self defense, as none of us want to get close enough to a large predator to stab them, but if worse comes to worse and all else fails, its nice to have some type of last defense on you. A knife may also be used for hunting if your trip ever forces you to have to hunt for food. Although I don’t recommend hunting a grizzly bear with one.

Rambo2

(Ok, I know its another Rambo picture, but can you blame me?)

 

Utility (Splitting Wood)

Fire is one of the most important elements when using a knife to survive, and we can all agree that most hikers are not bringing an axe with them on a 5 mile hike. This is where a good (When I say good I mean high quality) full tang (More on this in a future post) survival knife can come in handy. Just use another piece of wood to push your knife blade through the other piece of wood and split it, thus creating smaller chunks of wood to warm both you and your food up.

Splittingwood

(Just don’t try this with a pocket knife)

 

So there you go, 5 reasons you should always carry some kind of knife around with you (and make sure it is always sharp!). Have any other uses you find for your knife on your travels? Comment down below and make sure to like and share this post!

Sources:

http://www.eatingutensils.net/history-of-cutlery/knife-history/

Hiking the Smokies: Part 2

Happy Sunday! I finally stopped slacking and finished my post on he second half of our Smokies trip. Enjoy!

We arrived at the Russel Field shelter at around 12:00 pm on Sunday, where we first made some lunch and then spent most of the day resting.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Thea sitting at the shelter

Unfortunately, we did not bring a water filter, so we spent most of the day bringing up water from the spring .2 miles away and boiling it 16 oz at a time. I would say we had to run down to the spring about 8 times to refill water so we could stock up water for the walk back down the mountain on Monday.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After about 3 hours, other hikers started showing up to the shelter from the Molly shelter to the east. The Molly shelter didn’t have any water, so many of the hikers coming to Russel Field had hiked 5 miles further than originally planned just to be able to have water and food.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We had about 12 people stay at the Shelter that night, 2 of which decided to stay in tents. We gathered some sticks and made a fire in the cozy fireplace within the shelter to keep warm through the night since it was forecasting to rain heavily all night.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sleeping in the shelter was unlike any experience I have ever had. I have never slept in the middle of the woods in an open structure with 10 other random people I had only just met. The only things that kept me awake all night were the fear of  a bear coming into the shelter and the extremely uncomfortable wooden platform I was sleeping on. Needless to say I woke up with a very sore neck and back. Waking up was a great experience though, as the fog moved through the trees, the other campers were cooking their breakfast and I worked on starting a fire to warm us up after the cold and rainy night. One of the campers even took a shower in the water funneling down one of the valleys from the shelters roof. After about 10 minutes of making the fire, Thea exclaimed that she saw a bear, and all of the campers looked up in surprise as an adolescent black bear strolled nonchalantly through the campsite, stopped and looked at us, and then continued to walk down the AT. I only barely got my camera out in time to snap a picture of him walking away. It almost made me feel like i wasted by $50 on bear spray just before the trip.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After we had eaten breakfast we decided it was time to descend down the mountain back to Cades Cove, which was surprisingly just as hard as the trip up. The rain was off and on, but that meant that the roots and rocks on the trail (Of which there were MANY) were all wet and slippery. I was extremely happy that I thought to make walking sticks for Thea and I because we basically used them as a third leg going down the mountain as we twisted both our ankles about 5 times on the descent.

 

On the way down we actually came across a black snake, which coiled up and watched us, we had to wait about 5 minutes for him to calm down and slither away before we could pass. After that, we made it back down to the split in the path that marked just 1.6 miles before we were back to Cades Cove. The last 1.6 miles were a downpour, which is why I don’t have any photos of it. Thea came close to crying out of just being absolutely void of any energy.

This trip was one of the hardest trips I’ve ever taken in my life, and yet the most rewarding. The feeling of accomplishment I felt after making it up the mountain was something I don’t feel too often, as well as the opportunity to get away from all technology and communication with the outside world. If you ever want to go on a trip that challenges you and is something you will always remember, think about hiking up the smokies, you wont ever forget it.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Preparing For The Smokies – What I’m packing for the Appalachian Trail (Part 1)

One thing I have learned from the last couple trips I have taken is that I really need to spend more time packing. I have been severely underprepared for those trips, which have caused me a little trouble on the trails. So in today’s post I want to outline 5 of the most important things I’m bringing with me on the trail.

Backpack

The backpack is arguably one of the most important items you will bring on a hiking trip. The thing is, I don’t actually own one. Well…I don’t own a new one. My personal bag I own is a vintage back pack with an external frame. Needless to say, its not super comfortable. The backpack pictured is a Sierra Designs Ministry 40, borrowed from my dad. This is a 40 liter pack, so its big enough to fit all of my gear easily for a 5 day trip. This pack is designed more for ice climbing (which my dad uses it for) and rock climbing. However, when you are on a budget and someone offers to let you borrow their gear, you don’t say no.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

https://www.amazon.com/Sierra-Designs-Ministry-40-Backpack/dp/B004KQ9MTK

 

Dry Sack

This thing is amazing. I mean, you could find a lamb carcass and rig it to do the same thing, or you could spend less than 20 dollars to have an extremely water tight bag. I am going to be using this as my food bag. It easily compresses and keeps water out, so even if it pours rain and this is hanging outside to keep away from bears, your food will not get wet. This is definitely a must have for any hiking or kayaking trip.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

https://www.amazon.com/Unigear-Waterproof-Kayaking-Swimming-Snowboarding/dp/B01LZBV5AV

 

Sleeping Pad

I have never used a sleeping pad, but from my experiences without one, i cannot wait to finally use some sort of sleeping pad on my trip. Of course I didnt want to spend upwards of 50 dollars for one, so i tried my hand at making one myself. (Ill have a separate blog post of how i made it and how much it cost.)  A sleeping pad is important on hikes for several reasons. One, they give you a little cushion to make your sleep more comfortable, and two, they provide extra insulation to keep your back warm. If you have a sleepless night on the trail, the next day’s hike will be that much harder to finish.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Knife

Of course, a good knife is always essential on any type of trip in the wilderness. I picked up a relatively affordable Kershaw Brookside for 24.95 from Dicks Sporting Goods. This knife has a nice 3.25 inch blade that has assisted opening, which makes it fast to whip out the blade in case you need it for protection. (Don’t think that means you don’t need to bring bear spray)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/kershaw-knives-brookside-drop-point-folding-knife-16kshubrksdxxxxxxcut/16kshubrksdxxxxxxcut?

 

Compression Sack

Obviously, using space efficiently is one of the most important parts of a backpacking trip. To that end, backpackers use compression sacks, which as their name would imply, compress its contents to keep it as small as possible. I like to put clothes into it and compress it into a smaller size than a soccer ball. They aren’t too expensive and can be used for any trip, not just backpacking.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

https://www.amazon.com/Sea-to-Summit-Compression-Sack/dp/B000NQQ56E?th=1
So those are 5 things I am bringing to the smokies with me. Watch for the next post where I explain how I made my sleeping mat, and then I will be posting 5 more things I am packing for the trip.